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Vitamin K

Vitamin K Dosage & Review

Vitamin K Review Vitamin K includes several forms including Vitamin K1 (known as phytonadione) and Vitmain K2 (known as Menaquinone). Generally, Vitamin K activates proteins essential to blood clotting and therefore is used to reverse the effects of "blood thinning" medications when too much is given. Remember that Vitamin K intake should be consistent when you are under an anticoagulant therapy. It has also been used to prevent and treat weak bones including osteoporosis and may help in preventing hip fractures. Moreover, intestinal bacteria makes a form of vitamin K that accounts for half of your requirements. Vitamin K is categorized under Vitamins. It is also known as Phylloquinone.
Vitamin K
Also Known Phylloquinone
Description Vitamin K includes several forms including Vitamin K1 (known as phytonadione) and Vitmain K2 (known as Menaquinone). Generally, Vitamin K activates proteins essential to blood clotting and therefore is used to reverse the effects of "blood thinning" medications when too much is given. Remember that Vitamin K intake should be consistent when you are under an anticoagulant therapy. It has also been used to prevent and treat weak bones including osteoporosis and may help in preventing hip fractures. Moreover, intestinal bacteria makes a form of vitamin K that accounts for half of your requirements.
Typical Dose 45mg
Stacks
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Benefits and Effectiveness

  • Fecal Weight - Neutral [1]
  • Insulin Sensitivity - Increased [2]
  • Bruising - Neutral [3]

Vitamin K Dosage

45mg

Side Effects

Vitamin K is highly safe to use however, some special precautions and warnings should be noted. Vitamin K1 might lower blood sugar level so people with Diabetes should be monitored closely. Also, too muck Vitamin K may be harmful for those people receiving dialysis treatment due to kidney diseases.

Vitamin K Review: What is Vitamin K?

What is Vitamin K?

“K” was derived from the German word which means “koagulation”. Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin that primarily functions in helping blood clot (coagulate), and plays a role in bone health.

Vitamin K can be found in foods such as green leafy vegetables. It is unusual to have vitamin K deficiency since the bacteria that is in your intestines can make vitamin K. People that takes antibiotics and who are already low in vitamin K will most likely have vitamin K deficiency. Lack of vitamin K leads to excessive bleeding. Conditions such as liver disease, biliary or gall bladder disease, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, cystic fibrosis; taking anti-coagulants such as Coumadin or warfarin; and having severe burns can lead to Vitamin K deficiency.

An expanded comprehension of the part of vitamin K in the body other than blood coagulation drove a few specialists to propose that the suggested dose for dietary intake of vitamin K be increased. In the year 2001, The National Institute of Medicine, Food, and Nutrition Board somewhat increased their suggested dose of vitamin K, yet declined to make larger increases. They clarified there wasn't sufficient experimental confirmation to make larger increases in the suggested dose of vitamin K.

What are the conditions that could benefit from Vitamin K?

Prevents excessive bleeding in newborns: Administering vitamin K1 via orally or through injection can prevent bleeding in newborns.

Prevents excessive bleeding in people with low prothrombin levels: Taking vitamin K1 orally or injecting it into the vein can treat and prevent bleeding problems in individuals with low levels of prothrombin because of utilizing certain medications.

Reversing the effects of anti-coagulants (warfarin): Taking vitamin K1 orally or by injecting it into the vein can neutralize an excessive amount of anticoagulation brought on by warfarin. In any

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case, infusing vitamin K1 under the skin does not appear to be successful. Bringing vitamin K alongside warfarin additionally appears to stabilize blood clotting time in individuals taking warfarin, particularly those individuals who have low vitamin K levels.

Decreases the prevalence of breast cancer: Studies show that high levels of vitamin k2 can lower the risk of breast cancer.

Reduces the risk of prostate cancer: Early research suggests that increased intake of vitamin K2 (but not vitamin K1) could decrease the risk of prostate cancer.

Decreases the risk of heart disease: Research proposes that higher dietary admission of vitamin K2 is connected with a lower risk of coronary calcification, which happens when the internal lining of the coronary arteries builds up a layer of plaque, and in addition, a lower risk of death brought on by heart disease. By consuming foods that are rich in vitamin K2 such as milk products, meat, and cheese, you would be able to fight risks of heart disease. There are no known effects of vitamin K2 on the risks of heart disease.

Treats cystic fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a congenital lung disease wherein the person who is a victim of it has problems in digesting fat, which leads to decreased levels of vitamin K. This disease can be improved by taking a combination of vitamins A, D, E, and K since this results to an increase in vitamin K levels. Additionally, some studies show that vitamin K can increase the production of osteocalcin, which functions in improving metabolic regulation and bone-building. But there’s no enough evidence to prove if it really improves overall health in individuals who are suffering from cystic fibrosis.

Reduces cholesterol levels: Early studies show that vitamin K2 could help reduce cholesterol in individuals who are diagnosed to have high cholesterol levels.

Treats osteoporosis: As mentioned earlier, vitamin K increases the production of osteocalcin, which plays a role in bone-building by synthesizing osteoblasts (bone-building cells). Vitamin K works in tandem with vitamin D to regulate the production of osteoclasts (bone-eating cells), which are cells the remove old bone in order for the new bone to be deposited in its place.

Precautions and warnings

Alongside its required impacts, a medicine may bring about some undesirable impacts. In spite of the fact that not these symptoms may happen, in the event that they do happen they may require medical attention.

Some of the less common side effects of vitamin K are:

  • Hepatomegaly (enlarged liver)
  • Swelling of the entire body
  • Yellow skin and eyes
  • Decreased activity and movement
  • Reduced appetite
  • Irritability
  • Paleness
  • Stiffness of muscles
  • Difficulty breathing

Rare side effects include:

  • Itching, skin rash, hives
  • Fast and irregular breathing
  • Fast and weak heartbeat
  • Fainting and lightheadedness
  • Dizziness
  • Swelling of the face, lips, and eyes
  • SOB (shortness of breath)
  • Wheezing and/or troubled breathing
  • Chest tightness
  • Profuse sweating
  • Temporary hypotension (low blood pressure)

Some symptoms may happen that for the most part need not need any therapeutic considerations. These symptoms may go away during treatment as your body adjusts with the medicines given. Likewise, your physician might be able to give you some advice on how to prevent experiencing these adverse effects. Check with your physician if any of these symptoms may continue:

  • Pain, swelling, and redness over the site of injection
  • Unusual taste
  • Skin lesions over the site of injection
  • Flushing of the face

Other reactions not recorded may likewise happen in a few patients. On the off chance that you observe other side effects, consult your physician as soon as possible.

What is the recommended dosage for Vitamin K?

A dosage of 2.5 to 25 mg of vitamin K is recommended for patients who are suffering from hypoprothrombinemia or other bleeding disorders.

A dosage 1 to 5 mg of vitamin K is typically given to counteract bleeding if too much warfarin (anti- coagulant) is given. The laboratory test INR (international normalized ratio) is used to determine the exact dosage that should be given in these cases.

The dosages of vitamin K highly depends on the age of the patient.

  • 0 to 6 months old: 2 mcg
  • 6 to 12 months old: 2.5 mcg
  • 1 to 3 years old: 30 mcg
  • 4 to 8 years old: 55 mcg
  • 9 to 13 years old: 60 mcg
  • 14 to 18 years old (including those who are pregnant and breast-feeding): 75 mcg
  • Women over the age of 19 years (including those who are pregnant and breast-feeding): 90 mcg
  • Men over the age of 19 years: 120 mcg

References:

  1. http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/vitamin-k-class-oral-route-parenteral-route/side- effects/drg-20069592
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_K
  3. http://saveourbones.com/vitamin-k-osteoporosis/
  4. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-983- vitamin%20k.aspx?activeingredientid=983&activeingredientname=vitamin%20k
  5. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002407.htm
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^1 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12201222
^1 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18689371
^1 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19113922
^2 http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/34/9/e147.short
^3 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12140470
^3 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12140470
^3 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15153914

Comparisons [ top]


Results & Experiences

Daily Dosage # Stacks
100.00 mg 2
2000.00 mcg 2
5.00 mg 1
25.00 mcg 1
80.00 mcg 1
180.00 mcg 1
2100.00 mcg 1
2700.00 mg 1
90.00 mcg 1
20.00 mcg 1
Purpose # Stacks Effectiveness
Depressed mood 2
Unknown
Can't tell
None
Slight
Moderate
Major
Side Effects # Stacks
Stiffness/Spasticity 1
Commonly Paired With # Stacks
Vitamin D 21
Vitamin C 17
Magnesium 15
Vitamin A 14
Zinc 13
Fish Oil 12

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Wiki Last Updated: 2016-02-16