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Supplements Everyone Should Take

Health-Supplements-To-Take

Supplements are an addition to a optimal diet, thus there is no best supplement for anyone. However, there are supplements such as Vitamin C or Magnesium that everyone probably lacks in. Below is a re-print of a pretty well summarized post as to what you can take, originally found on PasteBin.

Vitamin B1 – Thiamin – 20mg/day – performs decarboxylation reactions; required for complete catabolism of sugars and keto acids; destroyed by alcohol use; deficiency produces neurasthenia, neurodegeneration, and metabolic syndrome.

Vitamin B2 – Riboflavin – 20mg/day – forms FAD, a ubiquitous cofactor used for 2-electron reductions, including the enzyme that detoxifies aminochromes. Along with NADH, needed to extract metabolic energy from foods

Vitamin B3 – Niacinamide or Niacin – 250 or 500mg/day (up to 2g/day; requirement is substantially increased during stressful conditions, eg. schizophrenia, and liver disease) – Precursor to NAD and NADPH, the most fundamental cofactors in living organisms. Functional deficiency affects all life processes. NADH is used to extract high-energy electrons from food-derived carbohydrates and proteins. NADPH is widely used by proteins in biosynthetic electron transfer reactions and is part of some antioxidant enzymes. Supplementation has been repeatedly found to have significant benefits in many (perhaps most) degenerative diseases. Niacinamide inhibits the breakdown of NAD.

Vitamin B5 – Pantothenate – 25mg/day – part of Coenzyme A; essential for fat metabolism and oxidative respiration; excessiely excreted in metabolic syndrome.

Vitamin B6 – Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate – 15mg/day – prone to oxidative destruction, especially when B3 is deficient; central to amino acid metabolism; deficiency arrests ‘non-essential’ protein synthesis; opioid addiction depletes vitamin B6.

Vitamin B9 – TetraHydroMethylFolate – 200ug/day – required to remethylate S-Adenosyl-Methionine; most people are functionally deficient; requirement increased by B12 deficiency; opioid addiction depletes folic acid.

Vitamin B12 – Methylcobalamin – 1000ug/day – normally produced by gut bacteria, which are impaired in everyone; required to recycle folic acid to allow for methylation; deficiency is associated with neurodegeneration.

Perhaps consider a High Bioavailable version of Vitamin B, click here to see one we recommend ($20).

Na-R-ALA – 10-100mg/day; along with thiamin (Alpha Lipoic Acid), oxidizes pyruvate produced by glycolysis; water/fat soluble antioxidant that recycles endogenous antioxidants; effective and non-toxic heavy metal chelator; low plasma levels are indicative of metabolic syndrome/diabetes; supplementation restores insulin sensitivity in diabetes and associated conditions (eg schizophrenia).

Vitamin D3 – Cholecalciferol – 5000 IU/day in winter, less with more sunlight exposure – produced from cholesterol by UV light in human skin. Mushroom skin produces the related compound Ergocalciferol, Vitamin D2, which can partially substitute for our own D3. Prevents calcium accumulation in soft tissue, plasma; prevents osteoporosis, may alleviate depression.

Vitamin E – d-Tocopherols – 30IU/day – up to 400IU/day depending on meat and PUFA consumption. Supplementation is not required if you eat only fruit. In most cases, avoid taking over 400IU/day. Best is to take a,b,g, and d (‘mixed’) tocopherols and tocotrienols rather than just a-tocopherol. Required for the hydrogenation of excess unsaturated fats and the prevention of their oxidation; spares and restores CoQ10. Antagonizes some of the effects of estrogen.

Magnesium – Magnesium Glycinate/chelate – 50-200mg/day Mg – required for ATP synthesis and retention; required for calcium absorption and utilization; prevents muscle cramping and bruxism. Consider L-Threonate for cognitive enhancement as it passes the BBB more easily into the brain.

Vitamin K2 – Menaquinone – 2mg/day – required for protein carboxylation; prevents bone demineralization and soft-tissue calcification; necessary for proper vitamin D and calcium metabolism; required for effective blood clotting. Vitamin D supplementation necessitates vitamin K supplementation. MK4 is the most active form of vitamin K in non-hepatic tissues.

Zinc – Zinc Picolinate/chelate – ~10mg/day of zinc – required for some antioxidant enzymes (Zn-SOD); required for insulin synthesis; various metabolic roles. Required for MAP binding to microtubules, and hence the structural integrity of neuronal dendrites. Disruption of Zn metabolism by aluminium is related to alzheimerism. Consider ZMA.

Selenium – Selenomethionine – 100ug/day – required for some antioxidant enzymes (GPx); required for the conversion of thyroid hormone to its active form (T3). Deficiency is associated with schizophrenia and diabetes.

Chlorella/Spirulina – 1-20g/day – single celled algae; extremely high in nearly all vitamins and minerals, as well as a wide variety of other biological molecules – good for detoxification. Can be eaten in unlimited amounts, like food.

Vitamin C – Preferably Magnesium, Potassium, or Sodium ascorbate – 10g/day; up to 300g/day for severe degenerative diseases – Apes cannot synthesize vitamin C and require enormous amounts from our diets. Required for many reduction/hydroxylation reactions (eg, synthesis of collagen, norepinephrine, carnitine). Spares and restores other antioxidants such as vitamin E and ALA. Subclinical deficiency impairs capillary integrity and catecholamine metabolism; promotes CVD, cancer, parkinsonism, schizophrenia, diabetes, and most other degenerative diseases. Cannot be obtained in even close to sufficient amounts, even on an all-fruit diet, since domesticated fruits are much lower in vitamin C and flavonoids than wild ones. Large (25g+) doses can be used to overcome opiate addiction, and to relieve pain. Adverse effects are extremely uncommon, with the exception of gastrointestinal discomfort at very high doses (which may itself be therapeutic).

Flavonoids – >500mg/day – catechol flavonoids are required for vitamin C activity; flavonoids improve the efficiency of many metabolic processes; substantially expand the protective capabilities of endogenous antioxidants; largely responsible for the health benefits of many foods. Berries, tea, chocolate, onions, and wine are well-studied sources.

Reishi/Cordyceps/Lion’s Mane – 1-5g/day – medicinal mushrooms; contain a multitude of natural nootropics, including noopept-like substances; broadly effective at preventing and reversing brain damage.
If you had to choose six of these, they’d be Vitamin B3, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, and vitamin K. They are inexpensive and nearly everyone is functionally deficient in them. Everything listed should be taken by anyone living in civilization who seeks to avoid disease and prevent aging.

For Vitamin C, try to find one that also includes flavonoids. For B3, niacin works about as well as niacinamide but also produces flushing and has blood lipid- and cholesterol-lowering effects.